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WARNINGS

Introduction

Acadia National Park Attractions

Footnotes

Links to Other Pages

 

Acadia National Park Visitors Center

WARNINGS: The State of Maine is widening Route 3 in Bar Harbor. Alternate routes will be established and parts of Route 3 will be closed as work progresses. Expect delays when traveling from the head of the Island (Town of Trenton) into the village of Bar Harbor. Pay close attention to the orange construction signage particularly when directed to alternate routes. All businesses along the routes will be accessible throughout the construction but access may be restricted. Follow the posted instructions carefully. When traffic is routed down the Crooked Road, drive carefully and within the speed limit. The Crooked Road is not designed for the level of truck traffic expected. A truck route was established along the Eagle Lake Road in Bar Harbor. The parking lots servicing the popular Eagle Lake carriage roads and trails are along this route. At the height of the tourist season, this road in the vicinity of the parking areas contains many vehicles parked along the road when the parking lots are full. Drive carefully in this area. If you park along the side of the road, exit your vehicle carefully. An eighteen wheeler truck cannot stop or swerve to avoid hitting careless people in this area. New traffic control signals were also installed at various intersections to better control traffic. You may find these traffic control signals at intersections that would normally not have them. Stay alert. The road work could take as long as three years to complete.

Bicyclists and motorcyclists should exercise extreme care in the construction areas and on roads like the Crooked Road. Maine law requires that motorists maintain a three foot (one meter) distance between their vehicles and bicycles when passing. This distance may not be achievable in the construction areas and on narrow, detour roads without the slowing of traffic or even stopping traffic. 

Many businesses hire summer workers from out of the country. These workers require visas that are limited in number this year. Be patient with these workers because many may be doing more work than usual. To make matters worse, some communities on Mount Desert Island have declared themselves "sanctuary communities." Most summer workers on Mount Desert Island are honest and hard-working. However, "sanctuary" designations may also attract felons that think they will be more free to ply their craft. Take precautions to protect your property while on Mount Desert Island. Lock your vehicle and don't leave valuables unattended. Many people on Mount Desert Island have a visceral hatred of President Trump. Republicans are a distinct minority on Mount Desert Island. Avoid political confrontations. Some people in Bar Harbor have been verbally assaulted or physically threatened over bumper stickers or clothing with a political message. If such a confrontation is imminent, walk away, get into your vehicle, lock it, rollup the windows and call the police on your cell phone.

INTRODUCTION

Acadia National Park is close to French Hill Pond and the water flowing out of French Hill Pond flows through a part of the park. Most of the fauna and flora of Acadia National Park will be the same as those found in the French Hill Pond area and will not be further described. This sub-web will describe sections of Acadia National Park and the unique features peculiar to those sections, including flora and fauna not usually found around French Hill Pond.

The photograph above shows the entrance to the seasonal Visitor Center at the main entrance to the park on State Route 3 or Eden Street in Bar Harbor. There is a very large parking lot at this entrance. The Visitor Center is closed during the winter but the parking lot is plowed. During the winter, information and park maps can be obtained at the park headquarters on State Route 233. First-time visitors to the park should view the orientation film in the Visitor Center when it is open, obtain a park map and a visitor pass. The Visitor Center building is located at the top of a stairway containing fifty-two steps, see the photograph below. If you can climb these stairs without stopping and still carry on a normal conversation when you reach the top, your participation in reasonable activities in the park (like trail hiking, biking or swimming) should not be limited. If you cannot, you should avoid strenuous activities.1 People who cannot climb these stairs at all can gain access to the Visitor Center building by parking in the parking lot next to the building.

Visitor Center Stairs

Every year many people are injured and some die in Acadia National Park. You must take precautions to avoid injury or death. The following are some of these precautions:

- Prepare yourself mentally and physically. Learn about Acadia National Park before you visit. At least a month before your visit engage in daily aerobic activities to build up your stamina. Consult your healthcare provider or trainer about the best activity for you based upon your plans.

- Wear good hiking boots to hike the trails in Acadia. Street and athletic shoes, sandals and flip-flops do not adequately protect against twisted ankles and will not provide the traction required on some slippery trails.

- Stay on the trails and let someone know where you intend to hike (e.g. leave word at your motel, campground etc.)! The park provides a free map that shows the trails adequately and all the trails are well-marked with signs, cairns and paint. People have been lost for days and even killed when they left the trails. STAY ON THE TRAILS!

- Wear insect repellent but do not wear perfume, after shave lotion etc. Some insects and animals are attracted to pleasant odors.

- Carry drinking water, a first aid kit and any prescription drugs you may require.

- Ensure your clothing is adequate for the expected weather conditions.

- Dogs are permitted in Acadia National Park but they must always be on a leash. Some trails are too difficult for dogs.

- Climbing the mountains in Acadia National Park does not require technical climbing gear (ropes, pitons etc.) if you stay on the trails. If you intend to use technical climbing gear, discuss your intentions with a park ranger. Some desirable climbing areas may be off-limits to protect endangered species. Keep in mind that the granite in Acadia National Park is fragile and may not be as supportive as similar, newer rock in the Rocky Mountains or Sierras. The mountains in Acadia National Park may not be as challenging as other mountains but are at least as dangerous. There is always a danger from falling rocks. Wear a hardhat off trails.

- Use caution when hiking or climbing at the seashore. Rocks by the seashore are very slippery and you can be easily washed out to sea by high waves or at high tide. Know the tide schedule. Allow time to get back to the mainland before high tide from islands that are accessible at low tide. Often people are trapped on Bar Island and many people have been washed out to sea by high waves because they ignored these dangers.

- If you are physically incapable of hiking the trails, you may still be able to enjoy walking on the carriage roads. However, be on the alert for horses, bicyclists and joggers.

- Report accidents, injuries and illegal activities to a ranger immediately.

- Law-enforcement rangers are authorized by the State of Maine to enforce Maine laws in addition to their authority to enforce federal laws. Some rangers are naturalists or other specialists and may not be fully trained as law enforcers. However, always cooperate with a ranger!

- Swimming is permitted at Sand Beach, Echo Lake and Lake Wood. Lake Wood has no lifeguard. Swimming is forbidden in Eagle Lake, Jordan Pond or the Hadlock Ponds because these bodies of water are public water supplies.

- Bicycles are allowed on the paved roads and most of the carriage roads but bicyclists must obey the rules of the road and exercise caution on hills where the road surface is loose.

Warning Sign for Bicyclists

- Boating is permitted on some lakes and ponds in the park with restrictions. The receptionists or rangers at the Visitor Center or park headquarters can provide you with the latest information.

- Fishing is permitted in most lakes and ponds in Acadia National Park with restrictions. A Maine State fishing license is required. The fishing license includes a booklet of regulations and restrictions. Fishing licenses can be obtained in some commercial establishments or from a town clerk's office. The Park information centers can advise visitors on the purchase of fishing licenses.

- Firearms are allowed in Acadia National Park under certain conditions. Discuss your firearm situation with a ranger at a park entrance point.

- Winter sports (skiing, snowmobiling etc.) are restricted to certain areas in Acadia National Park. Check with a ranger at park headquarters on state route 233, Eagle Lake Road in Bar Harbor concerning these areas and the rules for use of them . The following photograph shows Champlain Mountain in winter from the Schooner Head Overlook. A small portion of the Park Loop Road and some other areas, like the Schooner Head Overlook, are plowed in winter.

Champlain Mountain in Winter

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ACADIA NATIONAL PARK ATTRACTIONS

The following table contains links to descriptions of attractions in Acadia National Park.

Acadia Mountain
Acadia Mountain
Anemone Cave
Anemone Cave
Aunt Betty Pond
Aunt Betty Pond
Baker Island
Baker Island
Bar Island
Bar Island
Bass Harbor Head
Bass Harbor Head
Beech Mountain
Beech Mountain
The Beehive
The Beehive
Bernard and Mansell Mountains
Bernard and Mansell Mountains
Blackwoods Campground
Blackwoods and Seawall Campgrounds
The Bowl
The Bowl
Breakneck Ponds
Breakneck Ponds
Bubble Pond
Bubble Pond
The Bubbles
The Bubbles
Cadillac Mountain
Cadillac Mountain
Carroll Homestead
Carroll Homestead
Champlain Mountain
Champlain Mountain
Day Mountain
Day Mountain
Dorr Mountain
Dorr Mountain
Eagle Lake
Eagle Lake
Echo Lake
Echo Lake
Fabbri Memorial
Fabbri Memorial
Gorham Mountain
Gorham Mountain
Great Head
Great Head
Hadlock Ponds
Hadlock Ponds
Halfmoon Pond
Halfmoon Pond
Isle au Haut
Isle au Haut
Jordan Pond
Jordan Pond
Lake Wood
Lake Wood
Little Long Pond
Little Long Pond
Long Pond
Long Pond
Norumbega Mountain
Norumbega Mountain
Parkman Mountain
Parkman Mountain Area
Pemetic Mountain
Pemetic Mountain
Penobscot Mountain
Penobscot Mountain
Porcupine Islands
Porcupine Islands
Pretty Marsh Shore
Pretty Marsh
St. Sauveur Mountain
St. Sauveur Mountain
Sand Beach
Sand Beach
Sargent Mountain from Somesville
Sargent Mountain
Schoodic Peninsular
Schoodic Peninsula
Seawall
Seawall
Ship Harbor
Ship Harbor
The Tarn
The Tarn
Thompson Island
Thompson Island
Thunder Hole
Thunder Hole
The Wild Gardens of Acadia
The Wild Gardens
of Acadia
Wildwood Stables
Wildwood Stables
Witch Hole Pond
Witch Hole Pond
Wonderland
Wonderland
       

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Footnotes

1.See  Kunz, Jeffrey R. M. and Asher J. Finkel, The American Medical Association Family Medical Guide, Random House, New York, 1987, Page 14. The stair test is preliminary to a determination of a person's level of fitness. Passing this test does not ensure that the test subject is in good physical condition or has no medical issues that may arise during activities in Acadia National Park. If a person experiences pain or extreme shortness of breath during an activity in Acadia National Park, the activity should ceased until the discomfort ceases. If pain or extreme shortness of breath continues, medical advice should be sought. However, failing the stair test is an indication that the test subject would be wise to consult their primary care physician before engaging in any strenuous physical activity. The authors of this website are not qualified to give medical advice. Consult your healthcare provider if you are in doubt about your physical condition.

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Links to Other Pages

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