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Introduction

Specific Species

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Snapping Turtle

 

Introduction

Reptiles are of the class Reptilia. There are three orders of reptiles in North America: Crocodiles (Crocodylia), Turtles (Testudines) and Scaled Reptiles (Squamata). The last order consists of lizards and snakes. Lizards are in the suborder Lacertilia. Snakes are in the suborder Serpentes. There are no wild crocodiles or true lizards in Maine. Salamanders, which are lizard-like, are amphibians. Reptile means an animal that crawls or moves on its belly. The order name, Testudines, comes from the Latin for tortoise and refers to animals enclosed in a shell. The order name, Squamata, is from the Latin for "scaly." The suborder name, Lacertilia, is from the Latin for "lizard." The suborder name, Serpentes, is from the Latin for "serpent."

Snakes (Squamata Serpentes) have scaly, long bodies without limbs, eyelids or ear openings. They are carnivorous and swallow their prey whole. Snakes shed their skin as they grow. They mate before hibernating in the fall. Some may mate in the spring. The young may be born alive or hatched from eggs depending upon the species. A few snakes may be active all winter.

Turtles (Testudines) have protective shells into which many turtle species will retreat when danger threatens. Some turtles, like the Snapping Turtle, cannot retreat into their shells and can be dangerous. Their skin is scaly. All turtles lay eggs. 

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Specific Species

The following columns are specific orders of reptiles found in the area of French Hill Pond. Point and click on the photograph or common name of the species for which you wish a detailed description.

Species will be added as information becomes available.

 Squamata Serpentes Testudines
Common Garter Snake
Common Garter Snake
Snapping Turtle
Common Snapping Turtle
   
   
   

 

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Fauna of French Hill Pond